Earthship Blogs

Guided Earthship Tours

In addition to the self guided tour that goes through our Earthship Visitor Center daily, we also have  2 kinds of guided tours.

Guided tours are generally reserved for groups of 10 or more, however, we can accommodate a smaller group for a minimum of $100.

1) The Guided tour through our Earthship Visitor Center includes:
Admittance to the building which is very similar to a 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom, packaged Earthship.  The floor plan of the building has been altered, and is set up like a gallery.  There is a 15 minute video and a 45 minute slideshow, along with tons of literature, and photos.  There is also a gift shop and various pathways outside for you to walk and see the exteriors of some of the other structures in the immediate area. One of our friendly staff members will be available to guide your group through this facility and answer all of your questions:) READ MORE »

“Why Everyone Should Consider Living in an Earthship”

New blog post on Expanded Consciousness explains why you should consider living in an Earthship.

http://expandedconsciousness.com/2015/05/19/living-in-an-earthship/

“The American Dream” Earthships

“The American Dream Project” travelled around the United States on motorcycles visiting towns and communities in search of places where the American Dream is still alive.  In the “Taos: Innovation” episode they visited the Greater World Earthship Community and the Earthship Academy.  They spoke with Earthship Founder Michael Reynolds, Academy advisor Tom Duke and a few of the students.  They also pitched in and helped build a bottle wall at the EVE: Earthship Village Ecologies Project.

The “Extraordinary” Mike Reynolds

Mike Reynolds is featured amongst 50 people who fit the category of “extraordinary.”

By: Peter Horsfield

“Sustainable, comfortable and eco-friendly. These are just a few of the words that one can use to describe the architectural wonders called “Earthships” that were designed and constructed by Mike Reynolds, an architect with an environmentalist perspective. Mike’s designs may often be regarded by many as ‘unusual’ and sometimes even ‘impractical’, but one cannot but help admit that Mike’s radical architectural designs are indeed fascinating and amazing.”

http://www.thextraordinary.org/mike-reynolds

Waybee Updates

This beautifully finished global model Earthship called Waybee had its first tire pounded by the Earthship Academy students in March of 2014.

Five Academy sessions were dedicated to finish this building. The students built it themselves with the help of our talented crew. From door to doorknob, they worked at least 5 days a week for four weeks in full dedication to bring it to life.

One of the most amazing aspects of this field is seeing the skeleton of your work turn into a home that takes care of the people who will be occupying it. READ MORE »

Stagecoach Organic Farmer Making Progress on Earthship Project

In an update to a story we first brought you back in November 2012, Dirt Merchant Farms, which sells organic foods like fresh farm eggs, meats and vegetables in Stagecoach, has continued to build what are known as “Earthships” on their property.

An earthship is a self-sustaining building made out of recyclable materials, like tires and glass bottles.
He says they’re more durable than traditional homes made out of wood.
“Most stick-based buildings take a lot of time to build,” Alexander said. “They take a lot of money to buy. They’re around $200,000 for your mortgage nowadays, depending on what type of building you want, and you end up taking most of your time fixing the building as it’s going. Whereas, my earthship, as I build it, it’s created with mostly concrete, plaster, metal and things like that.”
On Sunday, I got to take a tour of the different earthships he’s building. Since first talking to him last November, he’s been working on two storage buildings, a greenhouse and a shelter for his pigs.
“Different farms are coming out that are using the different earthship technologies to help keep the temperature for our buildings, and help keep our greenhouses warm,” Alexander said. “Whereas, we don’t have to use fossil fuels, or woods or coals.”
One of the techniques he’s using to control the temperature inside an earthship used as a storage space is building dirt mounds around the structure.
“It’s packed around all sides, except for the south-facing side with dirt,” he said. “So, you use the earth berm to keep the building cool and warm, depending on what you want and what season.”
One of the storage spaces is set to be completed in the next several weeks.
Alexander says his neighbors have responded well to the construction of these earthships. Some, like the Litsingers, have also stepped in and helped.
“He won’t need anything to back up heat or cool,” said Marcia Litsinger. “It’s going to be perfect. Even his own water system will basically be within the earthship. I love it.”
“When he finishes it, it’s going to be great for him, for the environment, and for Lyon County, so that we can show that we are more progressive than we have been in the past,” said Steve Litsinger.
Alexander wants to show that anybody can make their home out of the recyclable materials, and help the environment in the future.
After receiving hundreds of tires from many northern Nevadans since November 2012, he says he now needs any used building materials like old doors, sheet metal and fencing. He also needs about 2,000 uncrushed cans.
If you’d like to help or have questions about his earthships, you can find Dirt Merchant Farms on Facebook. You can also e-mail them at spiritharmonyfarms@gmail.com or call them at (775) 450-8218.
Written by Adam Varahachaikol
from ktvn.com

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Taos & The Greater World Community

from go-van.com
By Captn_Julz • Photos: Guillaume Beaudoin

We’re producing too much trash on a daily basis, and we don’t recycle enough. We’ve already passed that point where waste management has become a problem, and not only for the Thirld World anymore. One man had a vision more than two decades ago with a new way of building houses in a sustainable way, Michael Reynolds’ idea has never been as needed and Earthships are getting build in many parts of the world. READ MORE »

Off the Grid

from gridphilly.com

In West Philadelphia, organizers use tires and earth to create an ambitious and energy-passive home

At a glance, the open-air lot at the corner of 41st and Lancaster appears to be littered with garbage—tires piled up in the northwest corner, mounds of dirt and cement mixed in with empty bottles and cans. But these familiar objects are not strewn about randomly; they have been intentionally collected to build the first urban Earthship. When it’s completed, it could be the most sustainable building in Philadelphia.

An Earthship is a passive solar house made from both natural and recycled materials (such as earth-filled tires), which makes it much more affordable to build than a conventional home. The design is the brainchild of New Mexico based iconoclast architect Michael Reynolds. Five years ago, Philadelphia resident Rashida Ali-Campbell watched Garbage Warrior, a documentary about Reynolds, and her life was changed. “Explosions went off in my head,” Ali-Campbell says. “Why haven’t we seen that here already?” READ MORE »

Touchdown! Lancaster Ave Lands an Earthship

from gridphilly.com

gridphilly-feb-2015

Earthship village will soon land in Colorado Springs

Earthships aren’t designed to take families out of this world to explore other galaxies. But they are taking off on this planet and will soon land in Colorado Springs.

The Colorado Solar Village is seeking the greenest of the green to form a community of some of the most sustainable homes in existence, Earthships included. The goal, according to developer Dave Hatch, is for the roughly 65-home community to be fully self-reliant for energy.

Hatch is so sold on the idea, he’s offering a free electric car to the first eight buyers to commit.

“Our goal, really, is to bring sustainable housing to everyone in an affordable way,” Hatch said recently.

For now, the 400-acre village is an empty plot of land on France-
ville Coal Mine Road, east of Colorado Springs, but Hatch said he hopes construction will begin in spring. No one has closed on any property yet, but Hatch is confident the idea will catch on.

“I am sure there are 65 people in this county who think this is a pretty neat thing,” he said. “I’m sure of it.”

Hatch said lots are ready for construction, and he plans to put up at least one model home in the spring.

He expects interest will pick up quickly from there.

Lot sizes range from 5 to 
40 acres, starting at $50,000. Home sizes ranging from 800 to 3,000 square feet are expected to cost $200,000 to $600,000, on top of the land purchase. Plans must go through an architectural review before construction.

The project was originally planned as an Earthship-exclusive community, similar to the Earthship village in Taos, N.M., which boasts self-reliant homes partially made with recycled materials such as brightly colored glass bottles that play artistic and structural roles.

But Hatch broadened the types of homes that will be available, an attempt to appeal to more people. So in addition to Earthships, the solar village will include GEOS-designed homes – more conventional-looking but equally solar-reliant – straw-bale and cob design adobe and stucco homes, and other green creations.

There will be another big difference between the Taos community and the one near Colorado Springs. In Taos, Earthships produce their own electricity and harvest rainwater that’s cleaned and recycled for conventional water use, watering indoor and outdoor plants, and flushing toilets.

El Paso County has strict regulations on harvesting rainwater, however, so prospective villagers shouldn’t expect to be self-reliant for H2O.

But as long as water conservation is a prime focus of the development, it will be an asset to the area, said Steve Saint, sustainability coordinator for the Green Cities Coalition.

“Most of the folks in the Green Cities Coalition feel like we really need to address water and food and have a huge effort to shift our dependence on water and food from the outside area to the area itself,” he said.

Since the development is small compared with the total number of homes in El Paso County, the overall impact on energy use will be small, said Kevin Gilford, assistant sustainability director at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. But the village can still serve as an example for greener living.

“The greater impact will be longer term, and that will be that people will realize that there’s another way to build homes,” he said.

Residents of the new village will have to pay a fee for a homeowners association, but Hatch said he is not yet sure what that fee will be.

Roads in the village won’t be paved, and if residents so demand, there could be community gardens and greenhouses, free range chicken and beekeeping facilities, a community barn, an electric car-sharing program and a community house where people can make meals together or hold classes.

That could be key to making it a truly sustainable community, Saint said.

“There needs to be a cultural design as well, so you get not only an eco-village with self-reliant structure, but you also get people who want to build a community together (of people) who want to trade, have potlucks, build chicken coops,” Saint said. “Cultural design would be really important because if it’s just a real estate deal and people are just buying in and selling when the market’s better, that’s not going to work.”

Hatch, who lives in Boulder, said he plans to move to the village once his daughter graduates from high school. He hopes the community will have an educational environment instead of being just another development. He doubts he’d be quite so enthused if he were putting up McMansions, he said.

“Yeah, I’m a businessman,” Hatch said. “But I really get excited about the educational aspect of it.”

Contact Kassondra Cloos: 636-0362

Twitter: @Kassondra Cloos
from gazette.com

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"Why Everyone Should Consider Living in an Earthship"

New blog post on Expanded Consciousness explains why you should consider living in an Earthship. [read more]
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Michael Reynolds es un líder mundial en energías renovables y arquitectura sostenible desde hace 45 [read more]