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green buildingsSustainable Community

“. . . the Earthship is the epitome of sustainable design and construction. No part of sustainable living has been ignored in this ingenious building.”

Guided Earthship Tours

In addition to the self guided tour that goes through our Earthship Visitor Center daily, we also have  2 kinds of guided tours.

Guided tours are generally reserved for groups of 10 or more, however, we can accommodate a smaller group for a minimum of $100.

1) The Guided tour through our Earthship Visitor Center includes:
Admittance to the building which is very similar to a 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom, packaged Earthship.  The floor plan of the building has been altered, and is set up like a gallery.  There is a 15 minute video and a 45 minute slideshow, along with tons of literature, and photos.  There is also a gift shop and various pathways outside for you to walk and see the exteriors of some of the other structures in the immediate area. One of our friendly staff members will be available to guide your group through this facility and answer all of your questions:) […]

By |July 28th, 2015|

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Out Of The Blue: Exclusive Behind The Scenes & Earthship Video

Take a look inside Earthship, a sustainable and self-contained green building in Taos, New Mexico and check out exclusive behind the scenes photos of our latest collection, Out Of The Blue.

One of the biggest factors in planning a shoot is finding a location that complements the story and clothing. For the Out of the Blue homepage we knew New Mexico would be the perfect backdrop; from white sands, to endless shades of green fields, red earth and deep blue skies, this state has so much to offer us.


By |July 11th, 2015|

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“The American Dream” Earthships

“The American Dream Project” travelled around the United States on motorcycles visiting towns and communities in search of places where the American Dream is still alive.  In the “Taos: Innovation” episode they visited the Greater World Earthship Community and the Earthship Academy.  They spoke with Earthship Founder Michael Reynolds, Academy advisor Tom Duke and […]

By |April 25th, 2015|

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Waybee Updates

This beautifully finished global model Earthship called Waybee had its first tire pounded by the Earthship Academy students in March of 2014.

Five Academy sessions were dedicated to finish this building. The students built it themselves with the help of our talented crew. From door to doorknob, they worked at least 5 days a week for four weeks in full dedication to bring it to life.

One of the most amazing aspects of this field is seeing the skeleton of your work turn into a home that takes care of the people who will be occupying it. […]

By |April 23rd, 2015|

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Stagecoach Organic Farmer Making Progress on Earthship Project

In an update to a story we first brought you back in November 2012, Dirt Merchant Farms, which sells organic foods like fresh farm eggs, meats and vegetables in Stagecoach, has continued to build what are known as “Earthships” on their property.
An earthship is a self-sustaining building made out of recyclable materials, like tires and glass bottles.

He says they’re more durable than traditional homes made out of wood.

“Most stick-based buildings take a lot of time to build,” Alexander said. “They take a lot of money to buy. They’re around $200,000 for your mortgage nowadays, depending on what type of building you want, and you end up taking most of your time fixing the building as it’s going. Whereas, my earthship, as I build it, it’s created with mostly concrete, plaster, metal and things like that.”

On Sunday, I got to take a tour of the different earthships he’s building. Since first talking to him last November, he’s been working on two storage buildings, a greenhouse and a shelter for his pigs.

“Different farms are coming out that are using the different earthship technologies to help keep the temperature for our buildings, and help keep our greenhouses warm,” Alexander said. “Whereas, we don’t have to use fossil fuels, or woods or coals.”

One of the techniques he’s using to control the temperature inside an earthship used as a storage space is building dirt mounds around the structure.

“It’s packed around all sides, except for the south-facing side with dirt,” he said. “So, you use the earth berm to keep the building cool and warm, depending on what you want and what season.”

One of the storage spaces is set to be completed in the next several weeks.

Alexander says his neighbors have responded well to the construction of these earthships. Some, like the Litsingers, have also stepped in and helped.

“He won’t need anything to back up heat or cool,” said Marcia Litsinger. “It’s going to be perfect. Even his own water system will basically be within the earthship. I love it.”

“When he finishes it, it’s going to be great for him, for the environment, and for Lyon County, so that we can show that we are more progressive than we have been in the past,” said Steve Litsinger.

Alexander wants to show that anybody can make their home out of the recyclable materials, and help the environment in the future.

After receiving hundreds of tires from many northern Nevadans since November 2012, he says he now needs any used building materials like old doors, sheet metal and fencing. He also needs about 2,000 uncrushed cans.

If you’d like to help or have questions about his earthships, you can find Dirt Merchant Farms on Facebook. You can also e-mail them at or call them at (775) 450-8218.

Written by Adam Varahachaikol

By |April 16th, 2015|

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Taos & The Greater World Community

By Captn_Julz • Photos: Guillaume Beaudoin

We’re producing too much trash on a daily basis, and we don’t recycle enough. We’ve already passed that point where waste management has become a problem, and not only for the Thirld World anymore. One man had a vision more than two decades ago with a new way of building houses in a sustainable way, Michael Reynolds’ idea has never been as needed and Earthships are getting build in many parts of the world. […]

By |March 17th, 2015|

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Touchdown! Lancaster Ave Lands an Earthship


By |February 5th, 2015|

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Salad from the Earthship Towers

From the Earthship Towers…

Bring something for lunch to accompany this delicious fresher than fresh aquaponic salad, we will be making for everyone at the office tomorrow. […]

By |February 5th, 2015|

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Los Técnicos Chixot Education Center

The purpose of the Los Técnicos Chixot Education Center is to provide Comalapan youth with marketable skills that will enable them to be responsible citizens and entrepreneurs.  Educational opportunities for teenagers and young adults in rural Guatemala are severely lacking, and this project will give them the tools they need to be competitive in the job market.  The school will offer relevant educational opportunities, create jobs, and combat environmental issues in Guatemala.


By |January 30th, 2015|

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‘Earthship’ revolution in the US

Once described as ‘idiotic’, new eco-friendly, self-sustaining homes are proving its critics wrong.
Taos, United States – It’s a green architectural movement that took root in the desert of New Mexico some 40 years ago. That’s when Michael Reynolds, 69, began experimenting with building homes out of garbage and natural materials that he called “Earthships”.
“I was [called] an idiot for building out of garbage, but people are starting to realise that maybe there is something to look at here,” Reynolds told Al Jazeera. Although it hasn’t been an easy journey, Earthships are becoming a more mainstream housing option. Today, people are living in Earthships in 50 states across the US, and in at least 25 countries around the world.
Earthships are built by digging at least 1.2m below the earth’s surface, where the temperature remains stable throughout the year, thereby needing no fossil fuel-derived energy for cooling or heating. Exterior walls are made of recycled materials such as truck tyres, used bottles and spent beer cans.
Solar panels and wind turbines on the house generate enough electricity to run electrical appliances.
Earthships also harvest their own water from rain or snow, and store it in a huge tank on the roof. This water goes through a filtration system and is used for drinking and cooking. […]

By |January 29th, 2015|

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