Grand Central

Taos & The Greater World Community

from go-van.com
By Captn_Julz • Photos: Guillaume Beaudoin

We’re producing too much trash on a daily basis, and we don’t recycle enough. We’ve already passed that point where waste management has become a problem, and not only for the Thirld World anymore. One man had a vision more than two decades ago with a new way of building houses in a sustainable way, Michael Reynolds’ idea has never been as needed and Earthships are getting build in many parts of the world. Read More

Zero Cost Wind Resistant Home

Hut Earthship Philippines

This is the outcome of Earthship Biotecture’s efforts to produce a zero cost – wind resistant home in the philippines. The building was given away to a local man and his son.

Off the Grid

from gridphilly.com

In West Philadelphia, organizers use tires and earth to create an ambitious and energy-passive home

At a glance, the open-air lot at the corner of 41st and Lancaster appears to be littered with garbage—tires piled up in the northwest corner, mounds of dirt and cement mixed in with empty bottles and cans. But these familiar objects are not strewn about randomly; they have been intentionally collected to build the first urban Earthship. When it’s completed, it could be the most sustainable building in Philadelphia.

An Earthship is a passive solar house made from both natural and recycled materials (such as earth-filled tires), which makes it much more affordable to build than a conventional home. The design is the brainchild of New Mexico based iconoclast architect Michael Reynolds. Five years ago, Philadelphia resident Rashida Ali-Campbell watched Garbage Warrior, a documentary about Reynolds, and her life was changed. “Explosions went off in my head,” Ali-Campbell says. “Why haven’t we seen that here already?” Read More

Ultra-sustainable ‘earthship’ built in Alberta

from canadiangeographic.ca

There’s sustainable housing, and then there’s sustainable housing. The Kinney family in Southern Alberta is living the latter, in what can only be described as the MacGyver of net-zero homes.

Last summer more than 30 volunteers from around the world and a hired crew of 13 people from New Mexico helped the Kinneys build what is known as an ‘earthship’. This self-sustaining, eco-friendly home is the brainchild of Earthship Biotecture Founder and Principal Architect, Mike Reynolds. It is an off-grid living structure made primarily out of recycled materials like empty beer cans, old tires and used glass bottles. Read More

Touchdown! Lancaster Ave Lands an Earthship

from gridphilly.com

gridphilly-feb-2015

How We Built Our Earthship, an Off-grid Prairie Home

It took five weeks and one volunteer army to rise this radically sustainable Alberta dwelling.

By Duncan Kinney, 30 Jan 2015, TheTyee.ca

When you tell people you’re building an Earthship, there are two stock responses. First there are the believers. These are the people who’ve watched Garbage Warrior, twice. They want to talk design and permits and timelines. They’re into it. The other stock response is an incredulous repeating of the word back to you with a question mark attached. Earthship? Read More

Los Técnicos Chixot Education Center

The purpose of the Los Técnicos Chixot Education Center is to provide Comalapan youth with marketable skills that will enable them to be responsible citizens and entrepreneurs.  Educational opportunities for teenagers and young adults in rural Guatemala are severely lacking, and this project will give them the tools they need to be competitive in the job market.  The school will offer relevant educational opportunities, create jobs, and combat environmental issues in Guatemala.

compound_oview Read More

Reciclaje de materiales en Rapa Nui: cómo se construye el nuevo proyecto del “Guerrillero de la Basura”

El arquitecto estadounidense Michael Reynolds, más conocido como “guerrillero de la basura”, aterrizó en Chile en noviembre de 2014 para comenzar la construcción de su segundo proyecto en sudamérica: un nuevo edificio autosustentable para la Escuela de Música de Rapa Nui, fundada por la concertista Mahani Teave y el constructor pascuense Enrique Icka.

La escuela tiene 70 alumnos y 200 en lista de espera, y ha funcionado -hasta el día de hoy- en espacios provisorios que no cumplían con las condiciones óptimas para la realización de sus actividades cotidianas. El diseño del edificio se basa en el prototipo “flor”, probado por Reynolds en otras latitudes de similares características climáticas, el que básicamente es una planta octogonal con siete salas multiuso y un acceso, además de baños y espacios de almacenamiento. Read More

Centro comunitário sustentável é construído com lixo

No Malawi, em África, resíduos foram utilizados para construir um centro comunitário sustentável – Centro Comunitário Kapita Earthship, que visa prestar serviços à população local.

malawi earthship casas sustentáveis

O polo de apoio vai contar com estufas para produção de alimentos, sistema de captação de água da chuva e painéis solares para gerar eletricidade. Read More

Earthship village will soon land in Colorado Springs

Earthships aren’t designed to take families out of this world to explore other galaxies. But they are taking off on this planet and will soon land in Colorado Springs.

The Colorado Solar Village is seeking the greenest of the green to form a community of some of the most sustainable homes in existence, Earthships included. The goal, according to developer Dave Hatch, is for the roughly 65-home community to be fully self-reliant for energy.

Hatch is so sold on the idea, he’s offering a free electric car to the first eight buyers to commit.

“Our goal, really, is to bring sustainable housing to everyone in an affordable way,” Hatch said recently.

For now, the 400-acre village is an empty plot of land on France-
ville Coal Mine Road, east of Colorado Springs, but Hatch said he hopes construction will begin in spring. No one has closed on any property yet, but Hatch is confident the idea will catch on.

“I am sure there are 65 people in this county who think this is a pretty neat thing,” he said. “I’m sure of it.”

Hatch said lots are ready for construction, and he plans to put up at least one model home in the spring.

He expects interest will pick up quickly from there.

Lot sizes range from 5 to 
40 acres, starting at $50,000. Home sizes ranging from 800 to 3,000 square feet are expected to cost $200,000 to $600,000, on top of the land purchase. Plans must go through an architectural review before construction.

The project was originally planned as an Earthship-exclusive community, similar to the Earthship village in Taos, N.M., which boasts self-reliant homes partially made with recycled materials such as brightly colored glass bottles that play artistic and structural roles.

But Hatch broadened the types of homes that will be available, an attempt to appeal to more people. So in addition to Earthships, the solar village will include GEOS-designed homes – more conventional-looking but equally solar-reliant – straw-bale and cob design adobe and stucco homes, and other green creations.

There will be another big difference between the Taos community and the one near Colorado Springs. In Taos, Earthships produce their own electricity and harvest rainwater that’s cleaned and recycled for conventional water use, watering indoor and outdoor plants, and flushing toilets.

El Paso County has strict regulations on harvesting rainwater, however, so prospective villagers shouldn’t expect to be self-reliant for H2O.

But as long as water conservation is a prime focus of the development, it will be an asset to the area, said Steve Saint, sustainability coordinator for the Green Cities Coalition.

“Most of the folks in the Green Cities Coalition feel like we really need to address water and food and have a huge effort to shift our dependence on water and food from the outside area to the area itself,” he said.

Since the development is small compared with the total number of homes in El Paso County, the overall impact on energy use will be small, said Kevin Gilford, assistant sustainability director at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. But the village can still serve as an example for greener living.

“The greater impact will be longer term, and that will be that people will realize that there’s another way to build homes,” he said.

Residents of the new village will have to pay a fee for a homeowners association, but Hatch said he is not yet sure what that fee will be.

Roads in the village won’t be paved, and if residents so demand, there could be community gardens and greenhouses, free range chicken and beekeeping facilities, a community barn, an electric car-sharing program and a community house where people can make meals together or hold classes.

That could be key to making it a truly sustainable community, Saint said.

“There needs to be a cultural design as well, so you get not only an eco-village with self-reliant structure, but you also get people who want to build a community together (of people) who want to trade, have potlucks, build chicken coops,” Saint said. “Cultural design would be really important because if it’s just a real estate deal and people are just buying in and selling when the market’s better, that’s not going to work.”

Hatch, who lives in Boulder, said he plans to move to the village once his daughter graduates from high school. He hopes the community will have an educational environment instead of being just another development. He doubts he’d be quite so enthused if he were putting up McMansions, he said.

“Yeah, I’m a businessman,” Hatch said. “But I really get excited about the educational aspect of it.”

Contact Kassondra Cloos: 636-0362

Twitter: @Kassondra Cloos
from gazette.com

Read More