Disaster Relief

Earthship Philippines Windship

philippines_phils_day_3
Earthship Biotecture partnered together with the Earth Village and the people of Barrangay Batug to coordinate and build a wind proof structure to use as a prototype for rebuilding in the Philippines. This 10-day hit was the first of several phases of rebuilding the affected areas of the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan. Read More

Earthship Malawi – Kapita Community Centre

Earthship to Launch First Phase of ‘Windship’ Design

Calling for Volunteers!

Earthship Biotecture will be joined by a team of 40 students in an effort to begin the rebuilding in the Philippines after Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan). This will be the first of several phases of rebuilding in the affected areas.

Here we will be launching the new design that was developed for this climate and for disaster prone regions. This design, called the “Windship” has been derived from with similar technologies to the Simple Survival Pod.

Earthship Biotecture will be working with the local community while teaching locals and volunteers Earthship principles and design. The project is in collaboration with the Earth Village Project, a collaboration between the ecovillage and permaculture communities in Asia and Australia. The Earth Village Project aims to provides integrative and sustainable community solutions in food security, natural built systems, energy and livelihood, community process, education and ecovillage design. The Windship Project will be one of the biggest ecovillage solutions to be presented to the Philippines in sustainable wind-proof housing. Read More

Why Are We Doing This?

Cambodia is a very poor country, and it needs innovative methods of creating a safe and secure places to live, with the minimum amount of external materials, to the lowest possible cost. As we’ve learned the people of Cambodia are very creative, and adaptive to new ideas, and we feel we can inspire change by inviting them to learn with us.

When?
We are starting this project at early to mid January 2014, and should be running for about a month or so.

About what we’re looking for

We are looking for people interested in new ways of thinking, earthship’s and permaculture, and who are not shy of a hard days work! The temperature here in January will be between 26° and 34° Celsius, and we’ll be working about 6 hours a day. The work will be quite hands on. Please contact or visit us to join in the build! We will take on about 10 volunteers, and we will prioritise people who can stay the duration of the build. Read More

Live Stream: Omega’s Where We Go From Here Weekend Conference

earthship events

Conference Live Stream, Plus a Keynote by President Bill Clinton: 10/05/2013 10/06/2013

FREE Live Stream: Omega’s Where We Go From Here weekend conference.

You’ll hear keynote addresses from top leaders in sustainability—Jeremy Rifkin, Majora Carter, David W. Orr, Janine Benyus, Paul Hawken, Rob Hopkins, Michael E. Reynolds, Bob Berkebile, and President Bill Clinton. There will also be plenty of conversation and a panel discussion between selected speakers. Read More

Earthship Biotecture plans benefit seminar

Earthship Biotecture will be host a benefit seminar Sunday (Aug. 18) for those interested in learning more about building while aiding a good cause.

The Earthship workshop is 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Taos Mesa Brewery.

The event will comprise of an all-day seminar with Mike Reynolds, Phil Basehart and the Earthship staff and crew. This will be followed by live music at 7 p.m. and other activities such as a raffle and family events. Read More

‘Garbage Warrior’ brings crusade to Christchurch

American architect Michael Reynolds, founder of the ‘Earthship’ movement is visiting Christchurch to offer innovative ideas for Christchurch’s rebuilding process.

“Mother nature’s recent behaviour is changing and traditional ‘built cheap and fast’ commodity-housing clearly is not coping. Here we have a housing solution that doesn’t just cope, it loves nature.” says Reynolds, who will be delivering a series of public talks and workshops about ‘Earthships’ – modern off-grid houses made out of cans, bottles and tyres, as well as conventional materials.

Read More

Simple Survival Concept and Rationale

A few years back we all drove big cars.  Those were the days of the big Lincolns and Chryslers, and Cadillacs.  Even the Chevys and the Fords were big.  They were made with thick metal and they were heavy and big.   When the energy crunches began, and fuel prices started to rise a few brave companies put out compact cars.  They were ridiculed at first.  They were called “toys” and “unsafe”.  The first models of compact cars were loosing issues in terms of profits but they illustrated that you can still get there in a smaller car… and get there a lot cheaper.  The fuel prices never stopped going up.  Sure they would take a dive here and there but the over all graph on fuel prices was up.  So it is now with housing. Housing has been big and inefficient for a long time.  Energy shortages and dwindling natural resources are making us look at smaller, more planet dynamic housing.  The Earthship Simple Survival Concept is our answer to this issue.

Read More

Michael Reynolds Inspiring words from the maverick eco architect

Michael Reynolds was the focus of the award-winning film ‘Garbage Warrior’ – a documentary about his 40 year struggle to build sustainable houses.

The Environment Show recently interviewed Reynolds as part of our new series on environment leaders. That interview is coming up soon. In the meantime we’ve found this 1 minute video* to give you an introduction to the man.

Plus we found so many great Reynolds quotes in our research, we thought we’d compile them for good keeping. (We couldn’t bear to let them get away.)

Read More

Why did we choose to help Haiti

Haiti Disaster ReliefWhen we first heard about the earthquake in Haiti, we donated some money to help out. We didn’t really think much more about it after the entire buzz was gone. But then, a year after the earthquake I saw some pictures of the situation down there and thought to myself, ‘They still need some help. And so I want to help them.’ I told some friends about my idea, and they liked it too.

Read More