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Stagecoach Organic Farmer Making Progress on Earthship Project

In an update to a story we first brought you back in November 2012, Dirt Merchant Farms, which sells organic foods like fresh farm eggs, meats and vegetables in Stagecoach, has continued to build what are known as “Earthships” on their property.

An earthship is a self-sustaining building made out of recyclable materials, like tires and glass bottles.
He says they’re more durable than traditional homes made out of wood.
“Most stick-based buildings take a lot of time to build,” Alexander said. “They take a lot of money to buy. They’re around $200,000 for your mortgage nowadays, depending on what type of building you want, and you end up taking most of your time fixing the building as it’s going. Whereas, my earthship, as I build it, it’s created with mostly concrete, plaster, metal and things like that.”
On Sunday, I got to take a tour of the different earthships he’s building. Since first talking to him last November, he’s been working on two storage buildings, a greenhouse and a shelter for his pigs.
“Different farms are coming out that are using the different earthship technologies to help keep the temperature for our buildings, and help keep our greenhouses warm,” Alexander said. “Whereas, we don’t have to use fossil fuels, or woods or coals.”
One of the techniques he’s using to control the temperature inside an earthship used as a storage space is building dirt mounds around the structure.
“It’s packed around all sides, except for the south-facing side with dirt,” he said. “So, you use the earth berm to keep the building cool and warm, depending on what you want and what season.”
One of the storage spaces is set to be completed in the next several weeks.
Alexander says his neighbors have responded well to the construction of these earthships. Some, like the Litsingers, have also stepped in and helped.
“He won’t need anything to back up heat or cool,” said Marcia Litsinger. “It’s going to be perfect. Even his own water system will basically be within the earthship. I love it.”
“When he finishes it, it’s going to be great for him, for the environment, and for Lyon County, so that we can show that we are more progressive than we have been in the past,” said Steve Litsinger.
Alexander wants to show that anybody can make their home out of the recyclable materials, and help the environment in the future.
After receiving hundreds of tires from many northern Nevadans since November 2012, he says he now needs any used building materials like old doors, sheet metal and fencing. He also needs about 2,000 uncrushed cans.
If you’d like to help or have questions about his earthships, you can find Dirt Merchant Farms on Facebook. You can also e-mail them at spiritharmonyfarms@gmail.com or call them at (775) 450-8218.
Written by Adam Varahachaikol
from ktvn.com

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Earthships: Self Sufficient Homes in New Mexico

Andrew visits a community where recycled materials make a green home.

Taos & The Greater World Community

from go-van.com
By Captn_Julz • Photos: Guillaume Beaudoin

We’re producing too much trash on a daily basis, and we don’t recycle enough. We’ve already passed that point where waste management has become a problem, and not only for the Thirld World anymore. One man had a vision more than two decades ago with a new way of building houses in a sustainable way, Michael Reynolds’ idea has never been as needed and Earthships are getting build in many parts of the world. Read More

Earthship Aquaponic Prototype

Four months after filling the pond with water, we have a thriving vegetable and soon, fish producing Aquaponic System in the Towers Earthship at Eathship Biotecture, Taos, NM. For those of you who initially thought that the pond looked like a “kiddy pool” and not really well integrated, take another look. It is beautiful, peaceful and serene, and producing food.

It is a joy to be working with this Aquaponic Prototype every day, as it not only is producing food, but is also aesthetically very pleasing, creating a beautiful serene atmosphere in the Towers greenhouse, making my work there a meditative experience every morning. I feel very blessed and wish I could spend all day there!

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How We Built Our Earthship, an Off-grid Prairie Home

It took five weeks and one volunteer army to rise this radically sustainable Alberta dwelling.

By Duncan Kinney, 30 Jan 2015, TheTyee.ca

When you tell people you’re building an Earthship, there are two stock responses. First there are the believers. These are the people who’ve watched Garbage Warrior, twice. They want to talk design and permits and timelines. They’re into it. The other stock response is an incredulous repeating of the word back to you with a question mark attached. Earthship? Read More

Academy classroom tour

Earthship Academy instructor Tom Duke walks you through the Academy classroom at the Greater World Earthship Community and shows you where students have their lecture classes and do their hands-on systems labs.  At the end there is a brief peek at the inside of the EVE (Earthship Village Ecologies) project.

earthship.com/classroom

Reciclaje de materiales en Rapa Nui: cómo se construye el nuevo proyecto del “Guerrillero de la Basura”

El arquitecto estadounidense Michael Reynolds, más conocido como “guerrillero de la basura”, aterrizó en Chile en noviembre de 2014 para comenzar la construcción de su segundo proyecto en sudamérica: un nuevo edificio autosustentable para la Escuela de Música de Rapa Nui, fundada por la concertista Mahani Teave y el constructor pascuense Enrique Icka.

La escuela tiene 70 alumnos y 200 en lista de espera, y ha funcionado -hasta el día de hoy- en espacios provisorios que no cumplían con las condiciones óptimas para la realización de sus actividades cotidianas. El diseño del edificio se basa en el prototipo “flor”, probado por Reynolds en otras latitudes de similares características climáticas, el que básicamente es una planta octogonal con siete salas multiuso y un acceso, además de baños y espacios de almacenamiento. Read More

‘Earthship’ revolution in the US

Once described as ‘idiotic’, new eco-friendly, self-sustaining homes are proving its critics wrong.

Taos, United States – It’s a green architectural movement that took root in the desert of New Mexico some 40 years ago. That’s when Michael Reynolds, 69, began experimenting with building homes out of garbage and natural materials that he called “Earthships”.

“I was [called] an idiot for building out of garbage, but people are starting to realise that maybe there is something to look at here,” Reynolds told Al Jazeera. Although it hasn’t been an easy journey, Earthships are becoming a more mainstream housing option. Today, people are living in Earthships in 50 states across the US, and in at least 25 countries around the world.

Earthships are built by digging at least 1.2m below the earth’s surface, where the temperature remains stable throughout the year, thereby needing no fossil fuel-derived energy for cooling or heating. Exterior walls are made of recycled materials such as truck tyres, used bottles and spent beer cans.

Solar panels and wind turbines on the house generate enough electricity to run electrical appliances.

Earthships also harvest their own water from rain or snow, and store it in a huge tank on the roof. This water goes through a filtration system and is used for drinking and cooking. Read More

Tour an Earthship

This week’s cover story in the Indy pertains to a new housing development, east of Colorado Springs, which will be modeled after a popular Taos, N.M. tourist stop: the Greater World Earthship Community.

A cluster of Earthships — off-grid, sustainably built habitats that are constructed in harmony with nature — should pop up here as soon as spring, 2015.

You can read the full story in our print edition, but should you desire to take an interior tour of some Earthships, watch this slideshow of images taken by Kirsten Jacobsen of Earthship Biotecture, compiled by Indy online content coordinator Craig Lemley.

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7 Good Reasons To Consider Calling An Earthship Home

An earthship is a type of passive solar home made from natural and recycled materials. What’s incredible about them is how luxurious they can be, but how practical and environmentally friendly they are. These are the ideal homes to build if you want to live off the land and off the grid. Here are 7 good reasons to consider calling an earthship home.

1. Earth Ships just kinda kick ass

I mean, just look at it! Who wouldn’t want to live there. It might be made in part from garbage, but it has a pretty amazing feel. I can say for sure that I wouldn’t mind living in one of these homes.

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