Michael Reynolds

About Michael Reynolds

Earthship Biotect

Earthship Biotecture, Taos, NM Internships

by Michael Reynolds, Earthship Creator.

Well kids here’s how it is… We have a 650 acre sustainable community that we fought hard for ten years to establish. The reason we had to fight was that we wanted no infrastructure or conventional utilities to be in this community. We wanted it green, sustainable, autonomous, and free. That upset everyone in authority so we were in for it. We kept fighting and finally got it.

We have maybe the only 650 acre development on the planet that is allowed to have no infrastructure or utilities. We sold this idea because the Earthship building does everything for itself.

[…]

By |December 14th, 2011|

Read More

Michael Reynolds, Earthship Creator, circa 1974

Empty steel beer and soft drink cans are used to build experimental housing near Taos, New Mexico, in June 1974. Designer Michael Reynolds stands next to an interior wall in one of the structures. The exterior walls are constructed using eight-can units as building blocks. According to Reynolds, these houses, whose walls require 70,000 cans in all, can be built as much as 20 percent cheaper than conventional homes.(David Hiser/NARA)

[…]

By |November 17th, 2011|

Read More

Earthships Village Design

by Michael Reynolds
This is “biotecture” designed for a city in Turkey. There is a mile-long bike lane through the Commons. Not only is the guy riding through the Commons’ greenhouse, this buffer zone contains the facility’s sewage treatment, water catchment and food production. The outside climate gets tempered twice on the way into the private homes – once in the Commons and then in the personal greenhouses. With this much locally produced food, the scale of the corner store is redefined. Provisions for vegetables, bananas, fish and chickens are part of the design.

[…]

By |September 21st, 2011|

Read More

HIVE LOG – August 5 2011

The concept for the HIVE is as follows…

It is after the developed world living systems – centralized utilities, economy, transportation, food production and government itself – have all gradually crumbled to the point of critical mass and fully collapsed. People are on their own. A small group of about a dozen people have stumbled on to a large building in the desert of New Mexico that has been abandoned. It was clearly an attempt at a sustainable building that failed. The basic structure was was quite beautiful with inspiring spaces built very well, but it ends there. There was a mis-guided attempt to provide luxurious, even decadent, systems in a sustainable way which in itself is a contradiction. In fact, this building is a testament to the inappropriateness that prevailed just before the fall.

[…]

By |August 8th, 2011|

Read More

Michael Reynolds’ Waste Vegetable Oil Mercedes – WVO

 

Michael Reynolds, creator of the Earthship concept, runs his ‘old Mercedes’ on Waste Vegetable Oil, WVO, obtained from local restaurants.

 

Watch the video of Michael Reynolds explaining what he does below.

 

 

 

 

[…]

By |April 11th, 2011|

Read More

Survival Is A Song

A way of life that gets people to the point where survival is a song we sing while living.

 

[…]

By |May 17th, 2010|

Read More

Q & A: Michael Reynolds Earthship Architect

Contributed by Mike Kitts
LONDON, England (CNN) — CNN caught up with Michael Reynolds, “biotect” of Earthships, in Taos, New Mexico.

What are your hopes for the future of Earthships?
It started off as individual homes, now we have two or three communities going. I hope to see in my lifetime to see towns and cities built this way. If you’re a huge developer and you want to build a small town you have to put in millions of dollars of infrastructure before you begin.
[…]

By |February 27th, 2010|

Read More

One Man’s Trash. . .

01/2010

– Interview with Michael Reynolds by Aleksandr Bierig

 

Soon after Mike Reynolds graduated from architecture school in 1969, he disregarded much of what he had been taught and began a 30-year practice of building “earthships”—off-the-grid dwellings built from what the rest of society deems garbage (discarded cans, bottles, and tires, among other items). His radical and unusual structures have received resistance from zoning and code legislations, spurring a continuing struggle to change the building permit process.

[…]

By |February 18th, 2010|

Read More