A Look at the Location of Your Earthship

Location is a serious factor in the whole process of acquiring an Earthship.  We have seen the permit process cause people a lot of expense and time.  In retrospect I would tell these people to choose some place else to live.  The permit officials can make the drawing process more expensive and take longer and at the same time water down the concepts to the point of making them only 50% of their intended efficiency.  

 

For example, we had a man come in from Pima County, Arizona.  It took him three years and several redraws and three times the price of the original drawings to finally get a permit.  Then when he did get it, the building was so watered down from its original concept that that it wouldn’t work as well and it cost three times what it would have.  This is the regulatory process that is meant to protect the people.  All it really does is inhibit evolution.  

A good example comes from a man who came to us from Crockett, Texas and said that he wanted an Earthship home.  He chose the Global model and four months later he walked in the door of his new home.  That is the difference that location can make.  

Earthships can work in any climate so the weather is not that much of a factor.  It is whether you have enforced codes or not that makes the difference.  With our culture’s ability to communicate through the internet, facebook, cell phones, etc., you can be in touch with people and still live away from regulatory nightmares.  The best bet is to contact the permitting office where ever you are thinking about building and ask what is necessary to build your own home.  We are finding that close to half of the continental USA is what we are calling “pockets of freedom,” or areas where the only permitting for building your own home is a septic permit, and that is no problem.  We have a conventional septic system inherent in our Earthship sewage treatment design.  

Our advice is if your area has strenuous regulations, it will be cheaper to build somewhere else.  Many places, however, have permits required but they are very low tech and easy.  The Earthship buildings have engineering back up for the design and any permitting office can easily determine that this building will perform and is a valid approach to building especially in todays world.  Interview with your permit office to determine whether you are in a pocket of freedom, a light duty permit situation, or a ridiculous  bureaucratic  nightmare.  There are only a few places that are ridiculous to build in and we advise to just stay away from those.  One of these places is Ventura County, California. I advise to stay away from there in terms of building anything.  There are a few others like that but the percentage is small.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cash for Trash on National Geographic

Cash for Trash on National Geographic In more ways than we know, our lives are built on trash. If you stacked up all the world's old junkyard tires, they would reach to the moon and back. So what can we do with them all? How about building houses.  Invented by architect Michael Reynolds of Taos, New Mexico, Earthships are custom-built, off-the-grid houses built from recycled materials, like recycled bottles (pictured), aluminum cans, used tires,...Read More

"The American Dream" Earthships

"The American Dream Project" travelled around the United States on motorcycles visiting towns and communities in search of places where the American Dream is still alive.  In the "Taos: Innovation" episode they visited the Greater World Earthship Community and the Earthship Academy.  They spoke with Earthship Founder Michael Reynolds, Academy advisor Tom Duke and a few of the students.  They also pitched in and...Read More

The "Extraordinary" Mike Reynolds

Mike Reynolds is featured amongst 50 people who fit the category of "extraordinary." By: Peter Horsfield "Sustainable, comfortable and eco-friendly. These are just a few of the words that one can use to describe the architectural wonders called “Earthships” that were designed and constructed by Mike Reynolds, an architect with an environmentalist perspective. Mike’s designs may often be regarded by many...Read More

Earthship-Festival in Köln Holweide

Zur Feier des #earthday war das noch3 Team am Earthship-Festival in Köln Holweide mit gutem Essen und functional Training auch vertreten. #eatclean #traindirty #noch3 #earthday #earthship #easyearthshipcrew #cologne A photo posted by Noch3 Performance Center (@noch3_performance) on Apr 22, 2015 at 12:13pm PDT

Stagecoach Organic Farmer Making Progress on Earthship Project

In an update to a story we first brought you back in November 2012, Dirt Merchant Farms, which sells organic foods like fresh farm eggs, meats and vegetables in Stagecoach, has continued to build what are known as "Earthships" on their property. An earthship is a self-sustaining building made out of recyclable materials, like tires and glass bottles. He says they're more durable than traditional homes made out...Read More

Taos & The Greater World Community

Taos & The Greater World Community from go-van.com By Captn_Julz • Photos: Guillaume Beaudoin We’re producing too much trash on a daily basis, and we don’t recycle enough. We’ve already passed that point where waste management has become a problem, and not only for the Thirld World anymore. One man had a vision more than two decades ago with a new way of building houses in a sustainable way, Michael Reynolds' idea has never been as needed...Read More

'Earthship' revolution in the US

'Earthship' revolution in the US Once described as 'idiotic', new eco-friendly, self-sustaining homes are proving its critics wrong. Taos, United States - It's a green architectural movement that took root in the desert of New Mexico some 40 years ago. That's when Michael Reynolds, 69, began experimenting with building homes out of garbage and natural materials that he called "Earthships". "I was [called] an idiot for building out of garbage,...Read More

7 Good Reasons To Consider Calling An Earthship Home

7 Good Reasons To Consider Calling An Earthship Home An earthship is a type of passive solar home made from natural and recycled materials. What’s incredible about them is how luxurious they can be, but how practical and environmentally friendly they are. These are the ideal homes to build if you want to live off the land and off the grid. Here are 7 good reasons to consider calling an earthship home. 1. Earth Ships just kinda kick ass I mean, just look at it!...Read More

Earthship 'biotecture' stays comfy without utilities

Earthship 'biotecture' stays comfy without utilities TAOS, N.M. —from http://www.ksl.com/?nid=1012&sid=29474554 If you landed in the desert surrounding this north-central New Mexico town, you might at first think you had landed on another planet. In a sprawling development a few miles northwest of town, the architecture is so wild and futuristic that it could just as easily be a colonial outpost on the moon. Yet the homes are largely made of trash, and...Read More

About Earthship Biotecture

Earthship construction drawings are designed to meet standard building code requirements so you can get a permit no matter where you are. Earthship Biotecture is beyond LEED Architecture. Earthships are green buildings that meet standard building codes. EarthshipBiotecture is based on the work of principal architect, Michael Reynolds. (see: media resume)

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